Is Your Product Really Worth That Much?

By Keith Center

(338 words)

We all want to feel that what we are selling provides great value to the customer.  But it’s not what we think that’s important, it’s the cusomer’s worldview.  It’s what they think of us and our product’s value that’s key.

When it comes to selling computer systems, we need to understand the client’s worldview, what they perceive to be of value, and what they don’t.

By asking questions like

  • “What have you seen so far?” (your competition)
  • “What did you like about what you saw?” and…
  • “What didn’t you like about it?”

You can start to assess where you stand in terms of the value that you bring and be prepared to explain it tangibly.

But what if you get in earlier in the selling cycle?  And you can provide amazing value they have not seen from anyone else.  What if you can not only provide them with the solution, but also the money to pay for it?  On top of that, you also provide them with a system to build a groundswell of support that will diminish resistance to change dramatically.

Now that’s value.  By using my system you get positioned as a trusted advisor, a partner, not just another provider.  By doing this you are automatically catapulted to meet with executives and provide the value that they want, a value that no other VAR has provided.

In my career I have done this many times over with Local Government and Higher Education.  The byproduct is that they will want to do business with you and seek ways to give you business even when your solution costs more.

In one case my client chose to buy a $4.8 Million solution from me, when the next closest bid was $2.3 Million.  They said it was for the best and lowest, not just lowest.  They saw the value, just like people who buy bottled water over tap water.

In this series we will cover how it’s done from my workshop “Selling to Non-Profits, Education and Government… Profitably.”

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